JUSTICE SHAH & AFZAL GURU PARADOX

I was less horrified by the louts of JNU who shouted themselves hoarse for the terrorist Afzal Guru, an arch enemy of India, and wantonly showed extreme malevolence towards the country through slogans steeped in hate in a ferociously savage display of anti-national sentiments than by the comment of Justice A.P.Shah who chose not to comment on this feral display of untamed animosity towards the country and instead rued, and I quote him, “executive let him(Afzal Guru)down”!!

A phrasal verb of “let” the expression “let him down” means failing to support or help someone as they hoped. Its synonyms are disillusioned, disappointed and forsaken. The “executive”, and I presume Justice Shah was referring to the Government of India, thus (so Justice Shah believes) failed to support or help Afzal Guru and in this failure disappointed him (Afzal Guru) who thus felt “let down”.

Now louts (like the howling wailing assortment of Afzal Guru supporters) are proven bumpkins who are known to act like philistines and to expect them to show any intelligence, sense or luminosity would be utterly foolish but a retired Chief Justice of a reputed High Court of the country is judged by different standards for obvious reasons. Or can it?

If Indian government “let Afzal Guru down”, as Justice Shah believes, it would have betrayed its trust. The “betrayal” would entail that India behaved traitorously towards him. And this, in turn, would mean that it violated a compact with Guru that the latter could join in the conspiracy to attack Parliament, kill people, and be exempt from punishment.

This put me in a dilemma. Punishment could only follow prosecution. And if punishment was wrong prosecution could not be justified. Afzal Guru could not have been arrested in the first place! Justice Shah does not seem to support this extreme position. His objection is to the imposition of death sentence.

But here comes the Afzal Guru Paradox – the credit for which goes to Justice Shah. If Afzal Guru was expected to attack Parliament and he acted accordingly as to make his punishment for it an act of betrayal by the government how could he be given any punishment at all be it death or sentence for life the latter being the one Justice Shah was a votary of? There is a contradiction inherent in the comment.

Or does Justice Shah believe Afzal Guru should not have been punished? That is the only way the “let down” comment can be justified. The man then is not a criminal but a martyr. The heroic act of attacking Parliament and the selfless killing of people showed Afzal Guru’s love for India for which he died!!

Is this not what the louts of JNU were contending? The similarity with louts should be embarrassing for Justice Shah. The embarrassment, however, would falsify the comment!

This topsy turvy world reveals a contradiction in the reasoning and the argument of a learned Judge. Can then the noisy yelling and bellowing equivalent of the same be coherent or justified?

If anyone is let down it is our country and its countrymen. First by the delayed punishment to Afzal Guru and now wailing frenzy of the uncouths of JNU and then by the teary-eyed comment of Justice Shah.

 

 

 

 

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